Direct Vision Standard FAQs

Helpie FAQ

  • Sensors v radar v AI cameras?

    The debate over the capabilities of both will continue to rage. Whilst it seems agreed that ultrasonic sensors are not intelligent enough to fulfil the requirements, radar or microwave sensors may determine the difference between a pedestrian and street furniture. Detecting a VRU approaching a stationary vehicle represents a different challenge, and the ability of a sensor to pick-up a protective clothed and helmeted motorcyclist or hooded pedestrian is debateable. ACSS supply a tested AI camera solution. Cameras which run video scene analysis on the blind spot area and pick out the human frame (shoulders, head, neck) offer the best method of detection by alerting the driver and displaying the view on an in-cab monitor. Cameras may get dirty and need cleaning yes, but there’s no arguing with what you can see with your own eyes on a screen! 

  • But the TfL specifications mention sensors, not AI cameras?

    TfL’s Guidance For Operators and technical Specifications on BSIS & MOIS do make reference to ‘sensor systems, but equally reference ‘can be achieved in the way that works best for the technology supplier & the vehicle operator’ and ‘sensors or other means of technology. Cameras are the best sensor technology there is. They offer detection and full view. There is no reason to think that a AI camera solution will not be compliant with the TfL requirements. 

  • When will, and what will, the next DVS changes be?

    At the inception of the Direct Vision Standard the scheme was scheduled to be reviewed in 2024. This has now occurred with the systems and technology updated. DVS Phase 2 is due to be reviewed in 2030. Nobody know whats will happen then but it would seem with the CCTV industry moving towards AI, more of this technology will be factored in. 

  • How do I know the system is compliant and will achieve the TfL Phase 2 Safety Permit?

    TfL have supplied all the relevant guidance and technical specifications for BSIS & MOIS. A system that fulfils these detailed requirements should be compliant. Until the application system opens for DVS Phase 2 from June 24 and applications are submitted and approved there are no guarantees. A solution from a reputable supplier and a system offering UNECE Regulation 151 & 159 approval are the safest bet. The TfL technical specifications on BSIS & MOIS state ‘vehicles that are approved to UNECE Regulation 159 / 151 will be deemed to comply with all of these requirements’. 

  • Are TfL approving and ‘rubber stamping’ PSS solutions?

    TfL are not pre-approving Progressive Safe System solutions. A solution from a reputable supplier and a system offering UNECE Regulation 151 & 159 approval are the safest bet. The TfL technical specifications on BSIS & MOIS state ‘vehicles that are approved to UNECE Regulation 159 / 151 will be deemed to comply with all of these requirements’. 

  • Will TfL change the requirements or timelines of DVS Phase 2?

    It’s no secret and no surprise that there been considerable and understandable pushback from the road transport industry to the changes. The costs are significant and the timeline short. TfL have always said they will assess the readiness of the industry nearer the time and this appears to be underway. On confirmation of the proposals, a three-month grace period was offered meaning that operators who had an appointment to retrofit a PSS system to their vehicle before the October 24 deadline, would be given three months grace. There has no sign of a change to this; neither to any of the other scheme requirements or timelines. 

  • Simple FAQ

    Simple FAQ Content

  • Simple FAQ - 2

    Simple FAQ Content – 2

  • Which PSS System should I fit to my fleet?

    Technical specifications and timelines have been published by TfL since the summer of 2023. Whilst the specifications are detailed, they are not 100% clear and in places could be viewed as contradictory. This ambiguity/lack of clarity and scope of the changes has led to suppliers offering different PSS solutions. Sadly, it has also meant a lot of ‘new arrivals’ to market offering discount solutions. It would seem wise to be wary of new operators and evaluate all solutions based on merit and likelihood of fulfilling the TfL requirements rather than purely price. Long established and accredited suppliers with long standing relationships with manufacturers will bring you the compliant solutions. ACSS have designed a system not only to fulfil the TfL requirements but to exceed and offer the highest level of protection and safety for vulnerable road users (VRU) and HGV drivers.